Motherland Coffee Braamfontein: Win a Coffee Date

motherland coffee

More than a month ago while in Braamfontein I spotted Motherland Coffee under construction. I was excited. My significant other having introduced me to the brand and hailing the coffee “the best ever”, I was looking forward to having the coffee within arm’s length; no need to travel all the way to Rosebank any more. Within a few weeks Motherland Coffee Braamfontein was open for business. But this shop looked and felt different to the beloved Rosebank one. The decor was awesome (a British telephone booth for a couch and fresh Joburg mural) yet the atmosphere, the vibe, the air of the place was somewhat not as chilled and groovy as the Rosebank branch. Aware that I was now comparing the two shops, I decided to let go of my preconceived ideas of Motherland and just experience it.

motherland mural

motherland interior

motherland coffee

Stand a chance to win a Motherland Coffee date with JoziChic and friends. Just vote on our poll and leave a comment.

You have until 30 October 2013 to partake in the competition.

All the best…
Jozichic

Black and Proud?

pic from wallsave.com

pic from wallsave.com

I had not taken my mother’s words seriously until just seriously. “You’ll understand when you’re grown up” she would say to a lot of the questions I’d ask when I felt I was being given unfair (I even called it abusive) treatment. Well, with a baby on the way some maturing has taken place and to my disappointment, South Africa is not the beautiful place we seemed to have grew up in. And as much as white people may have contributed to the state of the nation as it currently is, we as black people cannot be labelled victims. We no longer have the right to moan and groan and seeking sympathy, our heads down, whimpering as we hold out our cupped hands anticipating ‘human kindness’ and ‘generosity’. No, we are better than that. Yet it seems my people are still not convinced.

Living in Johannesburg, we are lucky to be exposed to so many cultures. As black South Africans, regardless of whether one is Zulu or Sotho, Xhosa or Tsonga, respect has been at the forefront of our education from an early age. We were taught to address people older than us by certain titles. We were taught to offer a seat to the elderly woman who enters a packed bus. We were taught to stand aside and let the older person walk past first should there not be enough space on the pavement. We were taught to show respect to the older generation and in turn respect ourselves too. Somehow in the process of gaining our independence we lost a lot of respect. Have you noticed how dirty most of our townships are? Have you seen the rubbish heaps next to the corner shop? Has your nose felt the foul sting of smells that linger in the streets of Joburg’s CBD? Have you seen how we push past each other in these crowded streets, how we fling vulgar words at the car that actually stops when the robots turn orange? Have you heard the sexist remarks, have you looked upon the perverted gaze of sweaty men who linger in street corners, their dirty hands ready to touch what does not belong to them? I am nauseated by the way my people have become. And as you know, there are those of my people who cannot be categorised with this disappointing bunch.

The black bourgeoisie (our cheeseboys and girls) are not exempt from this group. They are sometimes the worst: all you need do is listen to the way they talk to an old black woman serving them at a supermarket; how they ‘talk down’ to people who do not possess the immaculately, fluent and silky twang that is a false signal for class. However, South Africa has tons of good apples and they come in their wonderfully diverse variants. They are those taxi drivers who have told me sternly that a pregnant woman will not sit at the back and made sure I get a good seat. They are those men in the street who recognise a woman’s beauty and instead of hollering profanities, tell the woman ‘umuhle ingathi uligwinya’ (you are as beautiful as a vetkoek). They are those children who will see you as they run into a building and hold the door for you to enter and say ‘morning, mama’. They are those people who make sure they keep their homes clean, raking leaves and wrappers from their yards to the section of street in front of them. They are those employees who ensure their shop does not have foul smells and are proactive in keeping pests at bay. Oh my goodness, they are those ladies who, as black and as poor as I am, they smile at me from behind the counter and call me ma’am. They are those souls who are proud of their blackness. Those souls who respect their blackness. Those souls who respect themselves and other black people, not choosing who will be the recipient based on dress or status, oh no, the fact that you are a fellow black person, a fellow human being to be precise, guarantees it.

I am tired of our people sucking up to the white man. I have had enough of our people holding us at knifepoint for our expensive cameras while they pose and bare their wide ‘yes baas’ smiles to white tourists. I am frustrated at how our people will make small talk with a white person in a clothing store and even manage a smile yet when a darkie comes up to ask where the sleepwear section is, all she gets is the back of a head and a finger pointing in a direction. I am tired of our black borther and sisters who complain about working for Muslims or whites when we know that should they work for a black person they don’t do have the work they are paid to do. It’s no secret; I am pissed off.

James Brown sang the song and the Black Panthers took it up. Black people all over the world were filled with black pride. We fought for freedom and we fought for the right to be recognised as equals to white people yet it is us who, more than any other race, is still adamant we are inferior. We treat each other worse than we would a dog. We need to start believing that we, as humans of every colour and creed, are equals. Then we need to treat each other as such. Only then will we be able to sing confidently and truthfully at the top of our voices: “I’m Black and I’m Proud!”

Amandla Kwinana

LoVe Your Work Wardrobe: Nqaba Gqozana

MONDAY: Nqaba looking hot in her nerd glasses…

Name: Nqabakazi (Nqaba) Gqozana
Age: 24 years old
Occupation: Receptionist and Stylist
Current Town/City: Queenstown, Eastern Cape
Fashion Idol: Rihanna

TUESDAY: keeping things simple

WEDNESDAY: Midweek and a burst of PHLY to get her through

THURSDAY: Feeling girly and ready for after work drinks with the girls in that gorgeous A-line skirt

FRIDAY: All work and no play does not exist in Nqaba’s work wear vocabulary

To appear in LoVe Your Wardrobe, send your 5 pics (Monday to Friday) and personal info (name, age, occupation, city and idol) to jozichic@gmail.com. Men, you’re also welcome 🙂

Until week, truckloads of love…

Amandla Kwinana

Watchu Say – Men and Hollering

Holler Holler....

Whether you’re parading the streets in a body-hugging mini skirt or heading to the corner café in baggy T-shirt and unwashed face… men will holler! I’m sure the ladies out there have had their fair share of men who have hurled words like ‘sweetie, baby, s’thandwa, honey, mabebeza, my size’, the list goes on and on. I won’t go into those guys who try to touch! I have never understood why guys can’t just let a girl walk by uninterrupted. I spoke to a few guys to get the low down. Oh, and you’ll notice that I did not get any responses from truck drivers, construction workers and foreigners. I’ll let you come to your own conclusion, although I have to admit they are the worst culprits when it comes to hollering. With that said, here is what the guys had to say…

Question:
Why do guys whistle and/or holler at girls whenever they walk past?

On the Streets

Karabo

Karabo
(laughs) We do it to get the girls’ attention and take it from there if she stops for us.

Sibusiso

Sibusiso
I’ve never done that. But I think men do that ‘coz they’re bored and just want something to interest them.

Akhumzi

Akhumzi
If she is beautiful, you have to! But we do it in a group, you don’t holer at girl when you’re alone – you just don’t do it.

On Facebook

Lustar
Hollering and whistling are no form of respect… simply walk up to the girl/woman and say ‘Hello, I saw you from a distance and my heart said I’d like to meet you and here I am’… wait and see if she won’t give you the attention you need.

Thabiso
It’s the way we greet [girls] and show that respect when we like the girl.

Themba

It’s an African thing.

And then a funny thing happened…

Abiah (of Cream Cartel)
Imma murder, with the heel of a stiletto nogal, the person who added me to this chain!
Jozichic
As long as they are heels to die for…
Abiah
*bbm straight face* not impressed

Sense of humour – not existent.

On BBM

Ridzz
Whistling is a way to get her attention and if you’re lucky, she loks and waits for you.

KingKux
I don’t do it. I think it’s disrespectful.

Classified
I don’t do that. I would rather go up to a girl and tell her she is attractive. Men who [holler] do it because they want to evoke an emotion from the girl.

Well, from heated high heel ‘threats’, men craving attention and the obvious mentions of hollering being targeted at ‘pretty, beautiful’ women, I guess us women just have to live with this one. We will let bygones be bygones. And a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do, take it as a compliment; our vanity will appreciate it.

Jozichic

Watchu Say – All about looking good…

Bonang seems to get it right every time...

Looking good is something only a few manage to accomplish effortlessly. I wish I could say the same for myself… I have always envied people who look ‘absolutely ravishing’ and when I’ve asked how they did it, smugly reply, ‘Oh, I just threw this on’. Yeah right. Well, call me a pessimist, but I believe about 90% of our fashionable population spend a lot of time planning and trying on of different outfits before they can look in the mirror and exclaim, ‘Damn, I look gooood’. Well, I’d like to believe that. So, as always, I had to ask a few people out there.

The Question: How much effort do you put into looking good?

Bonnie (you can catch her every Friday right here on Jozichic)

“I always make sure I look good, any day, any day and time. I don’t spend as much time as many people think, dressing up just comes naturally for me. I put an effort in my image.”


Thabisa

Not much of a talker but she pulled off this look effortlessly – darn it.

Akhumzi

“I spend a lot of time on making sure I look good. Actually, earlier today I went shopping for pants and it took me 3 hours to pick out 3 pants. I ‘d rather spend that time choosing rather than do a rush job and be forced to return them. Get it right the first time.”

Well, it seems these Jozichic peeps are ‘naturally’ fashionable and whether it takes a few minutes or well, 3 hours, they make an effort to look good.

Jozichic

Watchu Say: Ooh so Hot

Attraction is a weird and wonderful thing. It can be aided by personality, but more often than not, appearance is the determining factor. And it’s not just the body or just the clothes… as you’ll read below, it’s the perfect combination!

The Question: Which fashion item makes the opposite sex just look hot?

Kamu
“Items that accentuate a woman’s assets (uses hands to motion hip and thigh area)… like shorts do with legs and tight pants with thighs”

Kamu



Khanyisa

“Oh, tight fitting T-shirts are hot… and straight cut formal pants”

Khanyisa

Fezile and Thuthukile
“When he’s casual, he must wear nice jeans… you know, straight leg and tight – but not too tight (they laugh), they must not be like leggings. And then with the formal look the ‘perfect cut’ suit is really hot”

Fezile and Thuthukile


Nolitha

“Good quality, good fitting jeans are hot. Guys, cheap jeans are just tacky!”

Nolitha

Bakang
“Tight, skinny jeans do it for me”

Bakang

Pamela
“I find that a guy is hot when he wears chinos, rolled up at the bottom and you get to see a bit of the hair on his legs… Ooooweeee, that is hot!”

Pamela


Ntsika

“Hi’mini skirt jo! Ezi’zincinci nyan! (It’s the mini skirt! The really short ones!) Ja, I like legs, but I’m more into the mid section, from mid thigh to bottom of stomach, all the way round…”

Ntsika


Bonnie

“Men: shorts and some tight fitting tees, but he must be toned. ”

Bonnie


Thalitha

“I like it when a guy wears really nice shoes; I find that hot… oh, and nice hats, too”

Thalitha

There you have it… Until next Monday.
And remember you can also take part and let us know Watchu Say on the Jozichic Facebook page!

Jozichic